Siding, Soffit, Fascia

Vinyl Siding

siding, vinyl siding

Weathercraft typically installs Mastic (formerly Alcoa), Alside, and Crane brand siding in various types listed below. We also specialize in hail damage repair of vinyl siding. Insurance companies typically will replace one side of a house after a hail storm and use old pieces to patch in on another side. This is common practice unless the old siding has been completely discontinued and is a unusual color. Weathercraft has experience in finding extremely close matches. We have installed almost every brand found in the Midwest and can purchase most brands available on the market.

Vinyl siding is the most commonly installed siding in the Midwest. It comes in five major thicknesses and an infinite number of colors and profiles. There are many criteria when determining the quality of vinyl siding including thickness, profile depth and hem technology. The better the quality of vinyl siding, the more expensive the product. In the Midwest, the better the quality of vinyl siding, the more resistant is it to hail damage. Baseball-size hail can break almost any kinds of vinyl siding. Cheaper siding can be broken by hail as small as a nickel.

The five major thicknesses of vinyl siding are .040-inch, .042-inch, .044-inch, .046-inch, and .048-inch. .040-inch is typically found on mobile and modular homes and is very thin. .042-inch is common across the country and the strength can be increased depending on profile depth and the use of a rollover hem at the top of the siding. .044-inch also is common across the country and is the thinnest that Weathercraft would recommend installing, unless keeping costs low is the main factor. .046-inch and .048-inch are considered quality thicknesses and can stand up to larger hail. Thickness is the main criterion that should be used in picking out a vinyl siding. Once a thickness is determined, then manufacturer quality, profile depth and hem technology should be considered.

There are also many different profiles of vinyl siding. They are first divided into two types: regular and dutchlap. Regular types look like a single-sloped piece of wood. Dutchlap types are designed to look like a vertical piece of wood with a small slope portion on the top. The profile is typically referred to first as the number of pieces of wood that are simulated per piece of siding and then by the inches wide the simulated piece of wood. Regular profiles are most common in Double 4-inch, Double 4 ½-inch, and Double 5-inch profiles. Double means that there are two simulated rows of siding per piece. For example, Double 4-inch siding is an 8-inch-wide piece of siding that simulates two rows of 4-inch-wide siding. Vinyl siding is also available in Triple 3-inch siding and Single 8-inch siding. Most manufacturers currently only make Single 8-inch siding in white. There are also some oddball profiles out there such as Triple 2 2/3-inch that can be found, but are rare. Three Dutchlap profiles can also be found: Double 4-inch Dutchlap, Double 4 ½-inch Dutchlap, and Double 5-inch Dutchlap. Each manufacturer also has its own wood grain pattern that makes matching hail damaged siding even more complicated. Wood grain patterns can range from smooth to dashed to deep.

There are numerous colors of vinyl siding. Colors are typically unique to a manufacturer and can be difficult to match due to fading and oxidation. Each manufacturer has a “family” of colors span its entire vinyl siding line. Previously, fading was an issue for darker colors. In the last 5 to 10 years, “Geloy” has been added to darker colors to prevent fading, but this has increased the costs of darker colors. Oxidation of vinyl occurs over time and is present in the form of a white chalky powder that builds up on the surface of the vinyl siding. It can be removed by washing or power cleaning the siding.

A recent trend in the vinyl siding market is insulation-backed siding. This siding has a thick EPS insulation glued to the back of the vinyl siding that serves two purposes. First, the added backing gives the siding much more strength and hail resistance. Second, it typically adds an R-value of 2 to 5 depending on the manufacturer. This greatly increases the cost of the vinyl siding, making it similar in the price range to steel siding. But because of its benefits, it is the fastest growing sector of the siding market.

There are also numerous accessories that can be added to vinyl siding to give it a more upscale look. Window and door lineals give the appearance of a thick wood trim around the opening. Vinyl shutters, gable vents and recessed mounts can be installed to give a better look for windows, gables and light or faucets. Vertical siding and scalloped siding are also available to be installed in gable ends to break up the look of the home, and to give it a more Victorian look.

Most manufacturers of vinyl siding extend a 50-year to lifetime limited material warranty with their products. Using Weathercraft as your contractor will automatically qualify you for these warranties.

Alcoa/Mastic

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Alside

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Crane

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NAPCO

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Certainteed

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Acessories

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Steel Siding

Weathercraft typically installs Revere and Rollex brand siding in various types listed below. We also specialize in hail damage repair of steel siding. Insurance companies typically will replace one side of a house after a hail storm and use old pieces to patch in on another side. This is common practice unless the old siding has been completely discontinued and is an unusual color. Weathercraft has experience in finding extremely close matches. We have installed almost every brand found in the Midwest and can purchase most brands available on the market.

Steel siding is installed throughout the Midwest. It comes in three basic profiles, Double 4-inch, Double 5-inch and Single 8-inch. The Double signifies that there are two simulated rows per piece of siding while the inches tell how wide the simulated row is. Each manufacturer has its own family of colors and wood grain textures. The deeper the wood grain texture and the thicker the steel, the stronger the steel siding.

Steel siding encountered some paint issues in the late 1980s and early ’90s. There was one main paint supplier for most steel siding manufacturers. There were some quality issues with this supplier that caused premature bubbling and peeling of the siding’s finish. This was mainly present in the color white across all brands, leaving the silver steel exposed. Because of the product warranties, many of the siding manufacturers went out of business or sold their steel siding divisions. A company called Gentek purchased most steel siding companies that had a presence in the Midwest, including Revere, Steelside and Alside. Rollex also still has a large presence in our territory. These companies will still honor those warranties by sending out a company to refinish the siding or supply the material for a contractor to replace it. Weathercraft will assist you in these warranty claims if you used Weathercraft to install your siding. These paint issues were corrected in the mid to late 1990s.

Some specialty companies sell “seamless” steel siding. Weathercraft does not believe that seamless steel is the best solution for the Midwest. First, steel expands and contracts with the temperature increases and decreases. In the Midwest, we have large temperature swings, often within 24 hours. On longer runs, this can buckle and warp, leaving issues on a continuous piece. Standard steel siding is 12 feet, 6 inches in length, and then there is a seam that allows the steel to expand and contract without buckling or warping. In addition, steel siding gets much of its strength from the deep wood grain patterns that act as stiffening ribs. These deep ribs are not possible with a seamless siding roll former. Most manufacturers of steel siding extend a 50-year to lifetime limited material warranty with their products. Using Weathercraft as your contractor will automatically qualify you for these warranties.

Alside

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Revere

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Gentek

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Rollex

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Aluminum Siding

Aluminum siding is relatively rare in the Midwest due to is susceptibility to being damaged by small hail. Most aluminum siding in our area was installed by a company called Pacesetters. This company is no longer in business and used extremely unique colors and panels, which are almost impossible to match. There are still some specialty companies that push aluminum siding.

Most of the manufacturers that make steel siding also make aluminum siding, including Gentek. Weathercraft does not recommend installing standard aluminum siding in our territory. However, there are some highly specialized types of aluminum siding that are good products in a commercial situation.

Fibered Wood Siding

Fibered wood siding has been installed in various forms for many decades. It has evolved over the years and its current form is installed in horizontal planks that typically have an exposure of 10 to 14 inches. It is extremely common on new homes being built. Most current manufacturers of fibered wood siding are coatings companies that market the siding based on the quality of the coating. Material warranty lengths are given by the coating manufacturer. If the coating on fibered wood siding is violated, the fibered wood is extremely susceptible to water damage.

Stranded Wood Siding

Stranded Wood Siding is a relatively new style of siding and has quickly become popular. It looks like plywood from the back and comes with or without a plastic lock rib, sometimes known as a ridged stack.  These are also marketed based on quality of coating.  Diamond Kote is the highest quality coating available in the Midwest.  Diamond Kote with ridged stack is the fastest growing siding product at Weathercraft.

Diamond Kote

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Fibered Cement Siding

Fibered cement siding is the fastest growing type of residential siding in the Midwest. Many new homes use either fibered cement or fibered wood siding. Fibered cement siding is a mixed cement product that is heavy and robust. It is hard to the touch and typically has an exposure of 10 to 14 inches. It is designed to last a long time and is a superior product to fibered wood siding.

Fibered cement comes in a primed finish that is ready for paint or a colored finish that is ready for installation and should not need to be painted. Most suppliers of fibered cement products are coating companies that market the siding based on the quality of the coating. The higher the quality of the coating, the more resistant it is to scratching and damage. Material warranty lengths are given by the coating manufacturer. James Hardie and DiamondKote are the two products that Weathercraft regularly installs.

Asbestos Siding

Asbestos siding was common in the 1950s, as asbestos was widely used in many industries. Asbestos is a strong micro fiber that gives strength to its products. Asbestos has been known to cause diseases when the fibers are inhaled into the body, and its use is almost nonexistent. Asbestos siding in the Midwest typically has a 30-inch-wide-by-12-inch-tall exposure. It has vertical lines in it that are flat and hard. They are usually white in color if it has not been painted. If you have asbestos siding, the material is no longer made or recommended for use. Asbestos siding should be removed by a state licensed contractor who is trained on proper methods for asbestos removal.

Weathercraft is certified by the State of Nebraska to remove asbestos siding.

Commercial Siding

There are numerous types and styles of commercial siding. One common type is vertical or horizontal metal wall panels. There are also other specialty types that Weathercraft is qualified to install.